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Full text of "Statues of Abraham Lincoln"

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Statues of 
Abraham Lincoln 



David Freeh 



Excerpts from newspapers and other 

sources 



From the files of the 
Lincoln Financial Foundation Collection 



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UNITED STATES HISTORICAL SOCIETY 

First and Main Streets • Richmond, Virginia 23219 • (804)648-4736 • Fax (804)648-0002 • 

www.ushs.org 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 

STATUE OF ABRAHAM LINCOLN TO BE UNVEILED IN RICHMOND 
Dedication ceremony on April 5 of the statue commemorating visit in 1865 

(Richmond) - A dedication ceremony for the statue of Abraham Lincoln and his 
young son, Tad, will take place on Saturday, April 5, 2003, at the Civil War Visitor 
Center in Richmond, Virginia. The statue depicts a personal moment during their 
historic visit of reconciliation in April 1865, just hours after the Confederacy abandoned 
Richmond, its capital. The U. S. Historical Society is donating the statue to the 
Richmond National Battlefield Park Civil War Visitor Center of the National Park 
Service. 

The United States Historical Society is generating funds for the statue by issuing 
solid bronze and bonded bronze miniature statues of the original. For more information, 
consult www.lincolninrichmond.org or call 1-804-648-4736. Sculptor David Freeh will be 
signing certificates of authenticity for the miniature versions at the unveiling ceremony. 

Lincoln's visit was unannounced but did not remain secret for long. "It was the 
man of the people among the people," marveled an eyewitness. "It was the great 
deliverer meeting the delivered.... such wild indescribable joy I never witnessed." To an 
elderly African American laborer who raced toward him shouting praise, Lincoln "lifted 
his own hat from his head, bowed, wiped the gathering moisture from his eyes." Father 
and son shared a unique experience: an unforgettable lesson on how to end a war. Tad 
was observing a father who, in the words of a dignitary who accompanied him from 
Washington, held no "thought of revenge or feeling of bitterness toward the 
vanquished." 

- more - 



Lincoln statue unveiling, page two of two 

The day opens with a symposium on "Lincoln in Richmond" to be held from 9 AM 
until noon at the Virginia Historical Society. Speakers discussing the significance of the 
president's visit to Richmond will be Harold Holzer, author of The Lincoln Image: 
Abraham Lincoln and the Popular Print ; Nelson D. Lankford, author of Richmond 
Burning: The Last Days of the Confederate Capital ; William Lee Miller, author of 
Lincoln's Virtues: An Ethical Biography ; and Ronald C. White Jr., author of Lincoln's 
Greatest Speech: The Second Inaugural . 

The dedication ceremony, beginning at 3:00 p.m. at the Civil War Visitor Center, 
will highlight a color guard, a school choir, a symphonic band, and remarks prior to the 
unveiling. The keynote speaker will be the Honorable A. Linwood Holton Jr., former 
governor of Virginia. Other speakers include Lt. Governor Timothy M. Kaine; Richmond 
Mayor Rudolph C. McCollum Jr.; Alice Harris of Richmond Hill, a descendent of slaves; 
Harold Holzer, Co-Chairman of the U.S. Lincoln Bicentennial Commission; Ronald 
White of the San Francisco Theological Seminary; and Joseph E. Garrera, President of 
The Lincoln Group of New York. 

Additional interviews are available with Robert Kline, Chairman, U. S. Historical 
Society; Martin Moran, President, U. S. Historical Society; Cynthia MacLeod, 
Superintendent, Richmond National Battlefield Park; and sculptor David Freeh. 

The United States Historical Society is a non-profit organization that works on 
behalf of museums, educational institutions, foundations, and other organizations to 
authorize projects that have historic significance, artistic value, and authenticity. 

II im ii 

ft ft If' 



Press must pre-register for the dedication ceremony by Friday, April 4, 12:00 p.m. 
To pre-register, contact : 

Elaine Mancini Dave dinger 

Mancini Communications The PR Council 

(914) 948-4264 (804) 644-71 01 

fax: (914) 422-3069 fax: (804) 780-1950 
mancini@toast.net 



ashingtonpost.com: Another Rebel Stand 



wysiwyg://3/http://www.washingtonpost.co.../wp-dyn/A30846-2003Jan8?language=printer 



washingtonpost.com 

Another Rebel Stand 

Lincoln Statue Causes Richmond Uproar 

By John F. Kelly 
Washington Post Staff Writer 
Thursday, January 9, 2003; Page B01 

Confederate heritage groups would like to do something Gen. Robert E. Lee's army couldn't accomplish 
138 years ago: keep Abraham Lincoln out of Richmond. 

A statue of the 16th president will be dedicated in April at the Tredegar Iron Works. The site is next to a 
National Park Service visitors center that tells the history of Tredegar, a foundry above the James River that 
forged Confederate cannons. 

But as with some other works of art — including a statue of Richmond native and tennis great Arthur Ashe 
and a banner of Lee — news of the Lincoln statue has touched a nerve in the former capital of the 
Confederacy. 

To Cynthia MacLeod, superintendent of Richmond National Battlefield Park, the statue is simply a way of 
publicizing a little-known historical fact: Lincoln visited Richmond in the waning days of the Civil War. 

"I just want people to understand and be interested in history, without having to have a win-lose or good 
guy-bad guy situation," MacLeod said. "We want people to understand the resources and events that are 
nationally significant. . . . The National Park Service isn't necessarily going to make a judgment whether 
people should like Lincoln or not." 

To Viola O. Baskerville, the Democratic state delegate in whose district it will sit, the statue is part of a 
long-overdue process to tell "the complete story of the Civil War." 

Others think the story of the Civil War has been told just fine up till now at Tredegar. Del. Richard H. 
Black (R-Loudoun) said, "Putting a statue to [Lincoln] there is sort of like putting the Confederate flag at 
the Lincoln Memorial." 

Black was so perturbed by news of the statue that he agreed to a request from the Virginia chapter of the 
Sons of Confederate Veterans to ask state Attorney General Jerry W. Kilgore (R) whether any Virginia laws 
prohibit placing the statue at Tredegar. 

None do. Although a Virginia statute forbids Union markings from being added to Confederate memorials, 
and vice versa, the ironworks building is on privately owned land that's leased to the federal government. 

That means the statue is on track for its April 5 dedication, 138 years and a day after Lincoln and his 
12-year-old son, Tad, alighted from a boat to tour a city still smoking from the fires a retreating 
Confederate Army had set the day before. 

"A lot of people think that Lincoln came to Richmond to do an end-zone dance, but it was just the opposite 
that he was doing," said Edward C. Smith, director of the American studies program at American 
University and co-director of the Civil War Institute, a week-long seminar devoted to studying the war. 

Smith is among the statue's supporters: "I really felt that until Lincoln was received as the restorer, not just 
the invader and the conqueror, quite frankly, the war in many people's minds would never be over." 



of 2 



1/10/2003 3:50 PM 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

State of Indiana through the Indiana State Library 



http://archive.org/details/statuesofabrahflinc 



ashingtonpost.com: Another Rebel Stand wysiwyg://3/http://www.washingtonpost.co.../wp-dyn/A30846-2003Jan8?language=printer 



Others see Lincoln's whirlwind trip as a victory lap, a humiliation of the city. "He sat at Jefferson Davis's 
desk and propped his feet up on the desk," said Bragdon Bowling, commander of the Sons of Confederate 
Veterans' Virginia division. Bowling said his group will continue to protest the statue's placement and is 
planning a conference to highlight Lincoln's less-admirable qualities. 

The life-size bronze statue is being donated by the United States Historical Society, a nonprofit 
organization headquartered in Richmond. Designed by Kingston, N.Y., sculptor David Freeh, it depicts 
Lincoln and Tad sitting on a bench against a granite wall. The words "To Bind Up the Nation's Wounds" 
will be cut into a granite capstone. 

The society's chairman, Robert Kline, said he had been thinking for more than 20 years that a Lincoln 
statue belonged in Richmond. Kline grew up in Illinois, where Lincoln launched his political career and 
where towering likenesses of him are fixtures in town squares. 

Kline allows that it might have been more historically accurate to put the statue at Rockett's Landing on the 
James River, where Lincoln disembarked for his tour, but that would have required city approval. 

"If there were any tax funds used or if it was on city property, it wouldn't have happened," he said. The 
society decided to foot the bill. 

Black said he is not sure a Lincoln statue belongs anywhere in Virginia. 

"We've got a Lincoln Memorial not that distant," he said. "It's a huge memorial right across the Potomac. I 
suppose you could put a Lincoln memorial in every city of the United States. I'm not sure what that 
accomplishes." 

Kline wouldn't say how much the statue will cost. Black and other critics grumble that the society is 
making the highly publicized donation as a way of hyping the $875 bronze and $125 resin miniatures it will 
sell. 

They will join another item offered by the society: a limited-edition, leather-bound edition of "Personal 
Reminiscences of General Robert E. Lee." 

© 2003 The Washington Post Company 



of 2 1/10/2003 3:50 PM 



Virginia city protests 
raising Lincoln statue 

April dedication expected in ex-Confederate capital 



By John F. Kelly 

Washington Post 

Confederate heritage groups 
would like to do something Gen. 
Robert E. Lee's army couldn't ac- 
complish 138 years ago: keep Abra- 
ham Lincoln out of Richmond. 

A statue of the 16th president 
will be dedicated in April at the 
Tredegar Iron Works. The site is 
next to a National Park Service visi- 
tors center that tells the history of 
Tredegar, a foundry above the 
James River that forged Confederate 
cannons. 

But as with some other works of 
art - including a statue of Richmond 
native and tennis great Arthur Ashe 
and a banner of Lee - news of the 
Lincoln statue has touched a nerve 
in the former capital of the Confed- 
eracy. 

To Cynthia MacLeod, superin- 
tendent of Richmond National Bat- 
tlefield Park, the statue is simply a 
way of publicizing a little-known 
historical fact: Lincoln visited Rich- 
mond in the waning days of the Civ- 
il War. 

' 'I just want people to understand 
and be interested in history, without 
having to have a win-lose or good 
guy-bad guy situation," MacLeod 
said. "We want people to under- 
stand the resources and events that 
are nationally significant. . . . The 
National Park Service isn't neces- 
sarily going to make a judgment 
whether people should like Lincoln 
or not." 

To Viola Baskerville, the Demo- 
cratic state delegate in whose dis- 
trict it will sit, the statue is part of a 
long-overdue process to tell "the 
complete story of the Civil War." 

Others think the story of the Civil 
War has been told just fine, up until 
now, at Tredegar. Delegate Richard 
Black, a Loudoun County Republi- 
can, said, ' 'Putting a statue to (Lin- 
coln) there is sort of like putting the 
Confederate flag at the Lincoln Me- 
morial." 

Black was so perturbed by news 
of the statue that he agreed to a re- 
quest from the Virginia chapter of 
the Sons of Confederate Veterans to 
ask state Attorney General Jerry 
Kilgore whether any Virginia laws 
prohibit placing the statue at 
Tredegar. 

None do. 

Although a Virginia statute for- 
bids Union markings from being 
idded to Confederate memorials, 
md vice versa, the ironworks build- 
ing is on privately owned land that's 
eased to the federal government. 

That means the statue is on track 
x>r its April 5 dedication, 138 years 
md a day after Lincoln and his 12- 
/ear-old son, Tad, alighted from a 
)oat to tour a city still smoking from 
he fires a retreating Confederate 



Army had set the day before. 

"A lot of people think that Lin- 
coln came to Richmond to do an 
end-zone dance, but it was just the 
opposite that he was doing," said 
Edward Smith, director of the 
American studies program at Amer- 
ican University and co-director of 
the Civil War Institute, a week-long 
seminar devoted to studying the 
war. 

Smith is among the statue's sup- 
porters: "I really felt that until Lin- 
coln was received as the restorer, 
not just the invader and the conquer- 
or, quite frankly, the war in many 
people's minds would never be 
over." 

Others see Lincoln's whirlwind 
trip as a victory lap, a humiliation of 
the city. "He sat at Jefferson Da- 
vis's desk and propped his feet up 
on the desk," said Bragdon Bowl- 
ing, commander of the Sons of Con- 
federate Veterans' Virginia division. 

Bowling said his group will con- 
tinue to protest the statue's place- 
ment and is planning a conference 
to highlight Lincoln's less-admira- 
ble qualities. 

The Life-size bronze statue is be- 
ing donated by the United States 
Historical Society, a non-profit or- 
ganization headquartered in Rich- 
mond. Designed by Kingston, N.Y., 
sculptor David Freeh, it depicts Lin- 
coln and Tad sitting on a bench 
against a wall. The words ' 'To Bind 
Up the Nation's Wounds" will be 
cut into a granite capstone. 

The society's chairman, Robert 
Kline, said he had been thinking for 
more than 20 years that a Lincoln 
statue belonged in Richmond. Kline 
grew up in Illinois, where Lincoln 
launched his political career and 
where towering likenesses of him 
are fixtures in town squares. 

Kline allows that it might have 
been more historically accurate to 
put the statue at Rockett's Landing 
on the James River, where Lincoln 
disembarked for his tour, but that 
would have required city approval. 

"If there were any tax funds used 
or if it was on city property, it 
wouldn't have happened," he said. 
The society decided to foot the bill. 

Black said he is not sure a Lin- 
coln statue belongs anywhere in 
Virginia. 

"We've got a Lincoln Memorial 
not that distant," he said. "It's a 
huge memorial right across the Po- 
tomac. I suppose you could put a 
Lincoln memorial in every city of 
the United States. I'm not sure what 
that accomplishes." 

Kline wouldn't say how much 
the statue will cost. Black and other 
critics grumble that the society is 
making the highly publicized dona- 
tion as a way of hyping the $875 
bronze and $125 resin miniatures it 
will sell. 



Sunday, January 12,2003 

The 



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Perspective 



Journal Gazette 

www.joumalgazette.net 
Sunday, March 30, 2003 11A 



Look away, Dixieland 

Civil War continues over Lincoln statue 



By Sylvia A. Smith 

Washington editor 

RICHMOND, Va. - To some, 
Abraham Lincoln is better known as 
"the invader" than as the 16th president 
who freed American slaves and who pre- 
served the states as one nation instead of 
two. 

Putting a statue of Lincoln in 
Richmond, Va. - the capital of the for- 
mer Confederacy - is an outrage, they 
say. 

"In a way, it would be like raising a 
statue of an African slave trader over in 
Africa," said Arizonian Richard Creel as 
he toured Richmond's Tredegar Iron 
Works, which made artillery and ammu- 
nition for the Southern army. 

The National Park Service rents one 
of the privately owned Tredegar build- 
ings as its Civil War visitors' center. On 
Saturday, the Lincoln statue will be 
unveiled on a plaza outside the visitors' 
center, directly across from a Civil War 
cannon. 

An online petition, signed by more 
than 3,300, is even more harsh than 
Creel's assessment: 

"A statue to this politician is no more 
appropriate in Richmond than one cele- 
brating Sherman who burned Atlanta to 
the ground or one glorifying the evil 
Third Reich to Hitler in Tel Aviv." 

The lifesize bronze is of a pensive 
Lincoln, sitting on a bench with his arm 
around his son. Tad. It will rest on a 
concrete pad surrounded by a low stone 
wall and was designed so visitors will 
approach it. touch it, even sit next to 
Lincoln or Tad to share their intimate 
moment. 

There were no photographs of Lin- 
coln's April 4, 1 865, visit to Richmond; 
famed photographer Matthew Brady was 
delayed and arrived a few hours later. 
The sculpture is an imagined scene of 
Lincoln's trip to the still-smoldering city 
a few days after it was set afire by 
retreating Confederate soldiers in the 
waning days of the Civil War. 

Lincoln's facial expression and body 
language telegraph the exhaustion and 
aching sadness of that time. There's no 
attitude of "conquering hero," said 
Dwight Pitchaithley, chief historian for 
the National Park Service. 

Robert Kline, president of the organi- 
zation that commissioned the statue, said 
Lincoln "looks kind of compassionate 
and a little on the frail side, which he 
was." 

Despite its name, Kline's group, the 
U.S. Historical Society, has no affiliation 
with the federal government and is sell- 
ing $875 and $145 miniature copies of 
the statue to raise $250,000 for the pro- 
ject. 

Joan Flinspach, president of Fort 
Wayne's Lincoln Museum, said the 
father-and-son pose conveys "the mes- 
sage that Lincoln was trying to cite in 
his second inaugural; With malice 
toward none, with charity for all." 

Location criticized 

For Lincoln's detractors, however, the 
pose of the statue is irrelevant, and the 
location of the sculpture is revolting. 
The inscription on the wall behind the 
statue, taken from the 1865 inaugural 
speech, is a stinging joke to (hem: 'To 
bind up the nation's wounds." 

"Richmond was the capital of the 




This statue of President Lincoln and his son Tad Is sched- ue has raised the ire of pro-Confederacy groups, which 
uled to be unveiled Saturday In Richmond, Va. The stat- view Lincoln as an Invader. 



"To erect a statue of Lincoln, that must strike even the 
most fair-minded people as being a little bit inflammatory. 
It's a little bit like picking a scab. Why Richmond?" 

- Larry Beane U, a Fort Wayne seminary student 



Confederate states. To erect a statue of 
Lincoln, that must strike even the most 
fair-minded people as being a little bit 
inflammatory. It's a little bit like picking 
a scab. Why Richmond?" said Larry 
Beane II, a Fort Wayne seminary student 
and member of the Sons of Confederate 
Veterans' national committee that tries to 
protest what they consider violations of 
Southern heritage, sucfi as restrictions 
on the display of the Confederate flag. 

"Southerners don't like the erection 
of some president - specifically, 
Abraham Lincoln - who ordered the 
invasion of this country," said Ron 
Wilson, the commander in chief of the 
Sons of Confederate Veterans. 

Wilson's Tennessee-based 32,000- 
member group first tried to block the 
erection of the statue and then tried to 
discredit the U.S. Historical Society. 

Whether the Confederacy was a sepa- 



rate country and whether the Civil War 
was a conflict about slavery are at the 
core of the dispute neo-Confederates 
have with what they see is a false repre- 
sentation of history. 

"Everybody knew it was a right of a 
state to withdraw," Wilson said. 'That's 
not debatable." 

Not so, say historians. 

"If you recognize that there was an 
'invasion,' you recognize the legitimacy 
of secession, which Lincoln wasn't pre- 
pared to do," said Harold Holzer, a vice 
president of the Metropolitan Museum 
of Art and co-chairman of the U.S. 
Lincoln Bicentennial Commission. 

Rep. Mark Souder, R-3rd, is one who 
utterly rejects the idea that the 
Confederacy was a sovereign nation. 

"They were not a separate country, 
period. They were in rebellion. I don't 
accept the premise (of secession) and 



that's what the Civil War was about. 
They didn't have the right to withdraw," 
said Souder, a history buff and a mem- 
ber of the congressional committee that 
supervises the National Park Service. 

War's aim 

There's also conflict about whether 
the Civil War was fought to end slavery. 

"Today, unlike in years past, unfortu- 
nately, our children and grandchildren - 
black and white - are being told that it 
was over slavery," Wilson said of the 
Civil War. "Lincoln said it wasn't fought 
over slavery." 

Historian lames Horton, American 
studies professor at George Washington 
University, said those kind of rational- 
izations are make-believe. 

"As a historian, I understand that to 
get at absolute truth is difficult to impos- 
sible. But there are some things that are 
very difficult to deny," he said. "I live in 
Washington, D.C., and anybody who 
lives here in the summertime will tell 
you that although you may want it to be 
something else, it is hot and humid. ... 
Sometimes truth is what truth is. 

'The Civil War was about slavery. It 
may not be popular in some circles to 

► SeeDlxleland/14A 



r 1*1 



14A The Journal Gazette < 

Dixieland 

From Page 11A 

think that. You may not want to 
think that. You may not want to 
think your ancestors to whom you 
are attached were taking up arms 
against the United States of 
America to protect and perpetuate 
the institution of slavery, but that's 
the fact of life. And they said so at 
the time, which is part of the reason 
we know that - at least in their 
minds - that's what they were 
doing." 

The Sons of Confederate 
Veterans cites an 1862 letter 
Lincoln wrote to Horace Greeley 
saying, "If I could save the Union 
without freeing any slaves, I would 
do it." 

Flinspach said Lincoln's beliefs 
about slavery evolved. But by the 
time he wrote the Greeley letter, 
Lincoln had drafted the 
Emancipation Proclamation. He 
hadn't issued it "because he had 
received advice from Seward, his ' 
secretary of state, to wait until there 
was a Northern victory. That was 
wise advice," she said. 

"Lincoln was already at a point 
in his personal beliefs beyond what 
he could publicly state in order to 
balance all the balls in the air to 
keep this precarious union togeth- 
er," she said. 

'All about money' 

Neo-Confederates brush away any 
such understanding. 

"I'll let you in on a little secret," 
said Ron Holland, publisher of the 
online Dixie Daily News, one of the 
speakers at a daylong seminar in 
Richmond last weekend organized 
around the idea that the legend of 
Lincoln has been sanitized and twist- 
ed. 

'That Lincoln statue by 'those 
people,' as Robert E. Lee called our 
enemies, is all about money, profits 
and economic power. Maybe it is 
appropriate, because that is really 
what Abraham Lincoln's economic 
policies and his war were all about," 
Holland said. 

Protesting that the Civil War was 
about economics and states' rights, 
said Indiana University historian 
Steven Stowe, "overlooks that the 
Confederacy was primarily involved 
in defending the slave system." 

"It isn't that states' rights and 
independence was first and slavery 
followed afterward. The reason they 
were disputing the federal govern- 
ment's differences with them was 
over the issue of slavery, not over 
some abstract issue of constitutional 
rights. What everybody was fighting 
about was whether slavery was going 
to continue or not," he said. 

Beane said he grew up in Ohio 
and was taught that interpretation of 
the Civil War. It wasn't until he 
began researching his Southern 
ancestors, he said, "I realized the 
books weren't giving me the whole 
story. When I looked at the whole 
J story, I came to realize that the 
Southern perspective of the war real- 
ly made a lot more sense. According 
to the Constitution and the principles 
of American government and 
American liberty, they were right." 
Beane insists he and other mem- 
bers of the Sons of Confederate 
Veterans are primarily concerned 
with countering the "disrespect" oth- 
ers display toward their ancestors 
who fought bravely. 

It's an attitude and perspective that 
some, but not all, Southerners 
embrace, Horton said. 

For them, he said, "the Civil War 
is still going on. . . . The South feels 
humiliated by the Civil War, and the 
South feels there are still people in • 
the country seeking to humiliate 
them even more so. I shouldn't say 
'the South.' We're not talking about 
everybody in the South, but we're 
talking about a very vocal group that 
sees the placement of this Lincoln 
statue there as kind of rubbing salt in 
the wounds." 

Beane bristles at the suggestion 
that there's an anti-black, pro-slavery 
context to the Sons of Confederate 
Veterans' emotional hostility toward 
the Lincoln statue. 



"We're not a bunch of snaggle- 
tooth Ku Klux Klan members," he 
said. 

"Generally speaking, we're intelli- 
gent people interested in history, 
interested in our family tree. We're 
good neighbors and law-abiding peo- 
ple. We just don't want to be discrim- 
inated against. We know who won 
the war. And I think it's terribly 
insensitive to try rub people's nose in 
it," he said. 

Yet in the defense of the 
Confederate flag and protest against 
the Lincoln statue, many see racism. 

"They don't get out there in sheets 
or really say any things we would 
consider denigrating to African peo- 
ple," Salim Khalfani, executive direc- 
tor of the Virginia NAACP, said of 
the Sons of Confederate Veterans. 

"But the fact that is their cause 
represented continuation and expan- 
sion of enslavement. If they had won, 
I probably won't be in this position 
talking to you now," he said. "So I 
wouldn't necessarily say that they are 
, like the National Alliance or some of 
the other white supremacist groups, 
but their promotion of the 
Confederacy is promotion, just the 
same, of white supremacy." 

Reconciliation 

The mayor of Richmond, a city 
that now is 58 percent black and 
governed by a largely black city 
council, said it strains credulity that 
defenders of Confederate symbols 
and protesters of the Lincoln statue 
see their actions as benign. 

"I really find it to be a total lack 
of sensitivity to this country and its 
history of what those symbols have 
not only symbolized, but what they 
have actually done to people," 
Rudolph McCollum said. 
. One answer to Beane's "why 



Sunday, March 30, 2003 




Th.il...i. ii „. , Sylvia Smlth/Tlie Journal Gazette 

Jil « « " ."l"*"' wl " ■» acro *> "»m this Civil War cannon outside 
the National Park Service's Civil War visitors' center In Richmond, 



The father-and-sori pose conveys "the message 
that Lincoln was trying to cite in his second inau- 
gural: With malice toward none, with charity for 
all." 

-Joan Flinspach, president of Fort Wayne's Lincoln Museum 



Richmond?" question is Kline's: 
"It's time for reconciliation." 
Souder is more direct: 
"I think they ought to build a 
statue of him in every state," he 
said. "Abraham Lincoln isn't a 
parochial symbol. He's a national 
symbol. Perhaps building a Lincoln 
statue five years after the war 
would have been a little in your 
face. But it's been 140 years." 

Stowe said erecting the first stat- 
ue of Lincoln in a state that was 
part of the Confederacy is a way to 
lance the bitter boil of the neo-Con- 
federacy movement. 

'They have decided the Con- 
federacy stands for underdogism 
and loyalty and manhood and sacri- 
fice. And don't bother me about 
other things like slavery. It's not 
rational. There's no way to talk 
them out of it," he said. 

"No matter who it is, if a group 
of people says I don't want to hear 
about another side,' then that to me 
is a sign we have to push on that 
point," Stowe said. 

"It's important to keep pressing 
at the point that the Confederacy 
stood for slavery. It may also have 
stood for the courage of some- 
body's grandfather, but let's never 
forget that it stood in defense of the 



system of human bondage." 

The hullabaloo over the Lincoln 
statue in Richmond is an odd conr 
trast to current events, Holzer said. 
"We've got more frightening and 
anxiety-producing things to worry 
about in this country," he said. "Just 
think about the prospect of allow- 
ing the words of Lincoln into the 
schools of Iraq and Afghanistan - 
words that consecrate democracy, 
that encourage freedom and liberty 
and self-determination and opportu- 
nity." 



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